Seminar on Quantitative Systems Pharmacology


Seminar on Quantitative Systems Pharmacology

JessieAu

 

PSE-Lab organized a seminar which is scheduled for Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at 2:30 PM at Politecnico di Milano, Aula Natta, CMIC Department, Building 6.

Quantitative Systems Pharmacology: Application to translational research and personalized/precision medicine

prof. Jessie Au

Founding Director of the Institute of Quantitative Systems Pharmacology e Research Professor & Mosier Endowed Chair in Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Oklahoma

 

Abstract

A major goal in academic biomedical research is to translate laboratory-based discoveries to clinically useful treatments. The recent advances in molecular medicine have provided the impetus for personalized medicine, and have led to successful development of new agents targeting molecular or genetic lesions. To date, most of the efforts have focused on using genomic information. The current presentation discusses quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP), an emerging research field, that has the potential of enabling precision medicine and eliminating the uncertainty in translational medicine.

Successful therapy requires delivering the right drug to the right target at the right concentration and at the right time, so that the right effect is achieved and off-target effect is minimized. Targeted therapy matches the drug’s intended target to the patient’s molecular signature. The remaining requirements are met if the drug delivery to the target site is aligned with the time course of drug actions (pharmacodynamics).

QSP is transdisciplinary, encompassing biology, physical and clinical sciences, and engineering. The goal is to use computation to quantify and integrate biological properties (e.g., cell cycle position dictates the response to phase-specific chemotherapeutics, copy numbers of resistance genes determines the effective drug concentrations), drug transport (e.g., to affected organs, cells, intracellular organelles), and population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, in order to depict and predict clinical trial outcomes.

This presentation will use two of our projects as examples. The first example shows the development of a bladder cancer treatment (randomized phase III trial completed). The second example shows an onoging project that uses a specialized drug/siRNA delivery system to treat peritoneal diseases (IND stage).

Further details on the seminar are available here.